Knowledge management issues in fast growth SMEs

Author

Associate Professor of entrepreneurship faculty of Tehran University

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a study of knowledge management understanding and usage in small and medium knowledge-intensive enterprises. Design/methodology/approach – The study has taken an interpretative approach, using two knowledge-intensive South ISFAHAN (Iran) companies as case studies, both of which are characterized by the need to process and use knowledge on a daily basis in order to remain competitive. The case studies were analyzed using qualitative research methodology, composed of interviews and concept mapping, thus deriving a characterization of understandings, perceptions and requirements of SMEs in relation to knowledge management. Findings – The study provides evidence that, while SMEs, including knowledge intensive ones, acknowledge that adequately capturing, storing, sharing and disseminating knowledge can lead to greater innovation and productivity, their managers are not prepared to invest the relatively high effort on long term knowledge management goals for which they have difficulty in establishing ...

Keywords


Article Title [Persian]

Knowledge management issues in fast growth SMEs

Author [Persian]

  • Kambiz Talebi
Abstract [Persian]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a study of knowledge management understanding and usage in small and medium knowledge-intensive enterprises. Design/methodology/approach – The study has taken an interpretative approach, using two knowledge-intensive South ISFAHAN (Iran) companies as case studies, both of which are characterized by the need to process and use knowledge on a daily basis in order to remain competitive. The case studies were analyzed using qualitative research methodology, composed of interviews and concept mapping, thus deriving a characterization of understandings, perceptions and requirements of SMEs in relation to knowledge management. Findings – The study provides evidence that, while SMEs, including knowledge intensive ones, acknowledge that adequately capturing, storing, sharing and disseminating knowledge can lead to greater innovation and productivity, their managers are not prepared to invest the relatively high effort on long term knowledge management goals for which they have difficulty in establishing